Is the Air You’re Breathing in the RED? Find Out With This Interactive Map

Check out the map of air quality in the United States. The RED areas have some of the worst air quality in the nation. To take a closer look click on the map below and then your state.United States Air Quality Map

You may not be able to do anything about outdoor air quality, but you can inside your home. Some simple steps you can take are:

  • Take smoking outside
  • Wash sheets and blankets weekly to reduce dust mites
  • Reduce dust build-up by dusting regularly with a damp cloth and vacuuming
  • Control pests by using bait and traps instead of spraying insecticides
  • Control moisture in your home to control mold
  • Use exhaust fans when cooking and showering
  • Fix leaky plumbing or other unwanted sources of water

If you’re interested in doing more for your indoor air quality RainSoft air purification systems treat the entire home, not just one room. Our systems mount directly into the ductwork of your home, providing cleaner, fresher air throughout the entire house. With advanced UV light and ozone lamp technology, the AirMaster Ultra system eliminates airborne contaminants in your home.

Contact:

RainSoft of Florida

1394 NE 48th St
Pompano BeachFL 33064

Phone: (954) 709-6014

RainSoft of Florida, an authorized RainSoft Dealer.


Or you can locate a RainSoft Dealer near you.

To read what people in your area are saying about RainSoft, check out RainSoft Reviews.

Indoor Air Pollution and Your Health

Indoor Air and Your Health

From A Guide to Indoor Air Quality 
by Consumer Product Safety Commission and Environmental Protection Agency

Health effects from indoor air pollutants may be experienced soon after exposure or, possibly, years later.

Immediate effects may show up after a single exposure or repeated exposures. These include irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, headaches, dizziness, and fatigue. Such immediate effects are usually short-term and treatable. Sometimes the treatment is simply eliminating the person’s exposure to the source of the pollution, if it can be identified. Symptoms of some diseases, including asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and humidifier fever, may also show up soon after exposure to some indoor air pollutants.

The likelihood of immediate reactions to indoor air pollutants depends on several factors. Age and preexisting medical conditions are two important influences. In other cases, whether a person reacts to a pollutant depends on individual sensitivity, which varies tremendously from person to person. Some people can become sensitized to biological pollutants after repeated exposures, and it appears that some people can become sensitized to chemical pollutants as well.

Certain immediate effects are similar to those from colds or other viral diseases, so it is often difficult to determine if the symptoms are a result of exposure to indoor air pollution. For this reason, it is important to pay attention to the time and place the symptoms occur. If the symptoms fade or go away when a person is away from the home and return when the person returns, an effort should be made to identify indoor air sources that may be possible causes. Some effects may be made worse by an inadequate supply of outdoor air or from the heating, cooling, or humidity conditions prevalent in the home.

Other health effects may show up either years after exposure has occurred or only after long or repeated periods of exposure. These effects, which include some respiratory diseases, heart disease, and cancer, can be severely debilitating or fatal. It is prudent to try to improve the indoor air quality in your home even if symptoms are not noticeable. More information on potential health effects from particular indoor air pollutants is provided in the section, “A Look at Source-Specific Controls.

While pollutants commonly found in indoor air are responsible for many harmful effects, there is considerable uncertainty about what concentrations or periods of exposure are necessary to produce specific health problems. People also react very differently to exposure to indoor air pollutants. Further research is needed to better understand which health effects occur after exposure to the average pollutant concentrations found in homes and which occur from the higher concentrations that occur for short periods of time.

The health effects associated with some indoor air pollutants are summarized in the section “Reference Guide to Major Indoor Air Pollutants in the Home.”

RainSoft Air Purification

RainSoft air purification systems treat the entire home, not just one room. Our systems mount directly into the ductwork of your home, providing cleaner, fresher air throughout the entire house. With advanced UV light and ozone lamp technology, the AirMaster Ultra system eliminates airborne contaminants in your home.

RainSoft of Florida

1394 NE 48th St
Pompano Beach, FL 33064

(954) 709-6014
www.rainsoft-fl.com

Or find a local RainSoft Dealer

Understanding Air Quality Alerts

Health Impact Of Air Quality Alerts

KERA news for North Texas

US EPA
Air pollution watches are common this time of year. They’ve been around since 2000, but rarely does anyone say what they mean. In a KERA Health Checkup, Robert Kent, Director of Environmental Programs for the North Texas Commission, explains the alerts are a warning about ozone in the North Texas air.

Robert Kent: Ozone is basically three oxygen molecules that have been bonded together. It’s highly reactive and unstable and so when it gets into the lungs then it ends up causing coughing, throat irritation, pain and burning in the chest and chest tightness. Additionally, if you have asthma or emphysema it can aggregate those conditions.

They’ve done some studies about what happens when we have ozone in the area and they’ll find that trips to the emergency room increase. There are more people who call in sick to work. There are more students who take absent on days when we have those. And so ozone definitely has an impact on the health of the general population.

Baker: Usually when the media gives those various levels, they just basically say, “We have an ozone alert at level orange.” But no one ever really says what that means. So what does each level represent?

Kent: So they’re color-coded on a scale so green, no problem at all. Yellow is moderate. Orange is unhealthy for sensitive groups – sensitive groups would be anyone that has respiratory problems. This would be people with asthma, emphysema, or other type of lung conditions.

Baker: So on an orange alert day, what should such people do?

Robert Kent: Individuals who are sensitive to ozone pollution should limit their outdoor activity. People who are not sensitive to ozone pollution, who don’t have asthma or emphysema or other lung conditions, they may have some effects if they are doing a lot of outdoor exertion. So if they’re working out a lot, or running, or playing basketball, they may end up feeling some of the impacts from ozone pollution on days like that.

Then you move up to red, which is unhealthy for pretty much anyone. And then you can move on to higher levels of maroon and purple, which are hazardous and very unhealthy. We haven’t had a level above red in many, many years. But this year we’ve already had one or two days that were red, and last year we had one day that was red as well.

Baker: I was just wondering, what would all of this mean for someone who is in reasonable good health? Read more…

RainSoft offers AIR PURIFICATION for the entire house, not just one room. RainSoft air purification products mount directly into the duct, providing protection and peace of mind…silently and out of sight. Visit our website RainSoft of Florida for more information.

Understanding Air Purification

Did you know that the EPA has found that the air within homes and other buildings can be more polluted than the outdoor air—even in the largest and most industrialized cities?
Government research also indicates that people spend approximately 90 percent of their time indoors, for many people, the risks to health from indoor air quality may be greater than the risk from outdoor pollution

What can I do to protect my family and home against airborne contaminates?

Doctors Recommend the AirMaster DFS as the World’s Most Advanced Medical Grade Air Cleaning System. RainSoft AirMaster DFS-effective and powerful air purification for your family’s health!

Imagine…
…a 90% cleaner home in just 30 minutes! Say good night to dangerous indoor contaminates. The AirMaster DFS is the world’s most powerful Disinfecting Filtration System with a germ killing destruction rate of 94% or higher and a better than 99.99% particle capture at 0.3 micron size.

RainSoft of Florida

1394 NE 48th St
Pompano Beach, FL 33064

(954) 709-6014
www.rainsoft-fl.com

Ozone Air Pollution – a Risk to Your Heart

Ozone Can Harm the Heart in as Little as Two Hours

A new study shows just how quickly exposure to air pollution can trigger dangerous changes in the heart, even in otherwise healthy young people.

By ALICE PARK | @aliceparkny | June 26, 2012 

Jarek Szymanski / Getty Images

Healthy, young volunteers with no history of heart disease showed unfavorable changes in their heart function after just two hours of exercising while being exposed to ozone, report researchers in the journal Circulation. The changes included surges in markers of inflammation, as well as drops in levels of enzymes that break down clots in the blood vessels — alterations that may explain the link between exposure to air pollution and heart risk.

The study is among the first to document the physiological changes caused by exposure to ozone, a major pollutant formed when volatile organic compounds from industrial waste or car exhaust reacts with sunlight. Previous studies have linked exposure to ozone to heart problems, but had not quantified the precise effect of the pollutant on biological markers of heart and lung function.

(MORE: Mom’s Exposure to Air Pollution Can Increase Kids’ Behavior Problems)

In the study, 23 young participants participated in two hours of intermittent exercise in a lab while being exposed first to “clean” air, and then to air containing 0.3 parts per million of ozone, which is higher than the amount found in average U.S. cities but about the peak level calculated for heavily polluted cities like Beijing, China and Mexico City. (However, the level is equivalent to the amount of ozone someone in an average American city would be exposed to over the course of seven to eight hours.) Scientists then compared readings on various biological markers of heart and lung function between the two sessions, to get a sense of ozone’s impact. Under the ozone conditions, the participants experienced a nearly 99% jump in levels of interleukin-8, an marker for inflammation in the blood vessels. They also showed a 42% drop in plasminogen levels, which lowers the body’s ability to break up blood clots. The study recorded the participants’ readings for only 24 hours after the experiment, and the changes were temporary and reversible: once the volunteers stopped breathing the heavy concentration of ozone, their measurements returned to normal levels. But the results show that ozone can have potentially harmful, and even deadly effects on the heart, say the authors. “This study provides a plausible explanation for the link between acute ozone exposure and death,” Robert Devlin, a senior scientist at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory and the study’s lead author, said in a statement.

(MORE: Traffic Noise Linked to Heart Attack Risk)

“The results complement what are suspicions are, and help us to apply what we know about pollution risk to populations we think are at especially high risk,” says Dr. Tracy Stevens, a cardiologist at St. Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute and a spokesperson with the American Heart Association. The findings highlight the dangers of pollution to people who might already have unstable plaques in their heart vessels, she says, since ozone can trigger a surge in inflammatory markers that drive these plaques to rupture, causing a heart attack. While Stevens says the risks of pollution in aggravating inflammation are known, having data that quantifies the risk as the current study does may help more people to appreciate and address ways to reduce inflammation. The American Heart Association recommends that people with heart disease avoid going out on high-ozone days, and lower their risk of exposure to heavily polluted air, including cigarette smoke.

Read more…